FIREBALL TECH FAQ

Q. GUIDE/MOVIES, MUSIC, & RADIO lights are flashing...?
Models: H-40, E, E2, DVDM, MX, & AVX
A. When a CD is ripped on to the internal hard drive, it is first copied in WAV format and then cued for encoding to the MP3 or FLAC format. The encoding process occurs in the back ground when the unit is not playing music and when it is in standby. The GUIDE, MUSIC, & RADIO lights flash when the unit is in standby if the encoding process is running. The lights will stop flashing when the encoding process is complete. The unit can be turned on at any time during encoding if you wish to use the unit. Approximate encoding times: MP3 = 15 minutes per CD. FLAC = 10 minutes per CD.

Q. Can I import DVD's onto the Fireball's internal hard drive?
Models: DVDM, MX, & AVX
A. Fireball manages DVD's from connected changers only. Currently, Escient does not offer a product that allows a DVD to be ripped to an internal hard drive because of the legal issues related to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998. If and when the legal issues are resolved, Escient will be in a position to quickly offer hard drive based DVD management products.

Q. I just installed an additional DVD changer but the Fireball is not recognizing it.
Models: DVDM, MX, & AVX
A. The most common reason is the external control port is set to the same port as the changer. To check this go to SETUP, AUDIO-VIDEO-COMM PORTS, then select COMM PORT SETTINGS. (on newer software -- SETUP, EXTERNAL CONTROL, IR & SERIAL, then select SERIAL CONTROL COM PORT.) Make sure EXTERNAL CONTROL or SERIAL CONTROL COM PORT is not on the same port as any attached changer(s).

A "null-modem" cable is required when connecting a DVD changer to the DVDM controller. Pinout for this cable is 2to3, 3to2, & 5to5.

Another option is to use a standard "straight-thru" cable with a "null-modem adapter". Here is a link for such an adapter at Radio Shack.

Q. Can the hard drive in my Fireball be upgraded?
Models: H-40, E, E2, DVDM, SE, MX, & AVX
A. Currently, there are no options to upgrade a FireBall to a bigger hard drive. However, we have added a new feature where a second FireBall can be installed and share the music on both FireBalls from an integrated music guide. We are also working on the ability to play music from PCs and from networked attached storage. This feature will be available in Q1 2006.

Q. Which MP3 portable players are supported?
Models: E, E2, DVDM, SE, MX, & AVX
A. Any MP3 portable player can now be supported by using the PC file sharing capabilities built into the FireBall. The PC file sharing feature allows you to easily movie files between the FireBall, a PC or Mac, and a portable player connected to the PC or Mac. Use the following links for more information on how to use the PC file sharing features and for moving files to portable players:

Windows XP Integration
MAC OS X Integration
IPod Integration – PC
IPod Integration – MAC

These features are built-in all E2, SE, and DVDM-300 products. The E-40 & E-120 can be upgrading with the PC file sharing feature using this link eupdate.

The FireBall H-40 included a USB connector and supported the Rio600, the Compaq PA-1, & the Compaq PA-2 models directly. There are no plans to add any other MP3 player support to the FireBall H-40.

Q. Can I install the E2 software on my FireBall H-40?
Models: H-40
A. No. The newer software uses a different operating system that does not support USB or HPNA. To benefit from the newer software & features, one would have to upgrade to a newer E or E2 model.

Q. Why is my CD/DVD "Unknown"? I know it has to be in the database!
Models: H-40, E, E2, DVDM, SE, MX & AVX
A. The first step is to verify the unit is getting online. A quick test is to go to SETUP, then UTILITIES, then select UPDATE SOFTWARE. If the unit is indeed online you will get a response back of, "No update required. Your software is up to date."

Unknown CD's – The FireBall reads the TOC (Table Of Contents) of each music disc and then contacts Gracenote to get the artist, title, & track names. This information is not on the CD itself. If a music CD comes back as "unknown", this simply means that TOC is not in the CDDB database; in which case you would have to manually enter the info.

Unknown DVD's – We maintain our own DVD database. In most cases, the DVD is in fact in our library unless it is something pretty obscure. Foreign DVD's might have a low hit-rate as well. Depending on where you purchased your DVD, it's unique code representing the Table Of Contents may differ from the actual DVD we used to enter it into our library. To work around this, we have a feature built in to the DVDM that allows you to browse our database to find a match.

See "CHANGER LOOKUP AND EDITING DISC INFO: A Guide to Editing Disc Information for DVD's and CD's" for detailed info.

Q. How to print my CD/DVD library?
Models: E, E2, DVDM, SE, MX, & AVX
A. You can print your CD and DVD library using the Fireball's build-in web server. You can access the web interface by typing the IP address of the FireBall or the FireBall "friendly name" into the web browser's address bar. Once the web interface is displayed, select OPTIONS and PRINT MUSIC LIBRARY under the "import/export" heading.

Q. How do I transfer music from my Fireball to my Apple iPod or other MP3 portable player?
Models: E, E2, DVDM, SE, MX & AVX
A. Music files on the FireBall hard drive can be transferred to an Apple iPod or any other MP3 portable players using the PC file sharing feature built into the Fireball software. You simply plug the iPod or other portable player into your PC or Mac and then drag files from the FireBall to portable player using the software on the PC or Mac. The PC file sharing feature on the Fireball requires the PC to be running Windows 2k/XP and a Mac to be on MacOSX and the FireBall and the PC must be located on the same local area network. Step-by-Step instructions on integrating your MP3 device can be found here for Windows 2k/XP and here for MacOSX.

Q. Why do I not get audio and/or video on a specific output when playing a disc from a connected changer?
Models: E2, DVDM, SE, MX & AVX
A. Fireball was designed to pass-thru both the audio and/or video from a connected changer. When a specific type of output is desired from the FireBall this connection must also be made from the changer to the FireBall.

Q. I copied music from my PC/Mac to the IMPORT folder on the Fireball but the music does not show up in the music guide.
Models: E, E2, DVDM, SE, MX & AVX
A. The Fireball is currently compatible with MP3, WMA, FLAC, and WAV digital music formats. When importing music to your Fireball please make sure that the music you are importing is one of the supported formats. Unsupported file formats copied to the IMPORT folder of the Fireball will appear in the import folder as a marker, but will not occupy any space on the hard drive and will not appear in the music guide.

Q. Music recorded to the hard drive of the Fireball E, E2, or DVDM, SE, MX or AVX does not appear on a remote Fireball zone player.
Models: MP-100/150/200, ZP-1 & FP-1
A. When recording music to the hard drive of the Fireball music server it will initially record the music in WAV format (lossless and uncompressed). After recording this music to the hard drive in wav format it will then compress the music into the specified format; either FLAC or MP3. In order to stream music to a Fireball zone player , the Fireball music server must first encode this music. However, the unit will only begin this encoding process when idle. Playing music and/or recording from the server will pause the encoding process and cause it to take additional time which results in this music taking longer to show up on the zone player.

Note: You can verify if the Fireball music server currently has music queued up to be encoded by placing the unit in standby. If the Guide/Music/Radio lights begin flashing this means that the unit is currently encoding music located on the hard drive.

Q. I did a bulk record from the attached changer to the hard drive of the Fireball but during playback all I received is dead air.
Models: E, E2, DVDM, MX & AVX
A. When recording from an attached changer to the hard drive of the Fireball a digital audio connection, either digital coax or optical, must be connected from the changer. By default the Fireball will use the optical audio input unless specified otherwise from within the setup menu. It is also recommended that you connected the analog left & right audio cables from the changer as well. During the record process if any type of CD copy protection is encountered the Fireball will switch to the analog input in order legally copy the CD. As a safeguard, it is a good idea to play a CD in each changer via the FireBall user interface and verify you hear music from each changer before starting a long record session.

Q. How many DVDs can be viewed at one time using both single and multiple attached DVD changers?
Models: DVDM, MX & AVX
A. Most Fireball models will only support a single zone of video even with multiple connected changers (with the exception of the DVDM-552, MX-752, and AVX-552 which provide a 2nd zone output intended for use with a MP-200). However, in the case of music, you are able to support multiple zones of music using additional Escient MP, ZP, and FP-1 zone players.

Q. After recording multiple CDs via the +1 drive to the hard drive of my Fireball record times have started to increase dramatically.
Models: H-40, E, E2, DVDM, SE, MX & AVX
A. Increasingly long record times via the +1 drive are usually the result of the Fireball's hard drive becoming full of temporary wav files which occupy much more space than a compressed format. When recording music to the hard drive of the Fireball music server it will initially record the music in WAV format (lossless and uncompressed). After recording this music to the hard drive in WAV format it will then compress the music into the specified format; either FLAC or MP3. However, the unit will only begin this encoding process when the FireBall is idle. Playing music and/or recording from the FireBall will pause the encoding process and cause it to take additional time. If you begin to experiencing increasingly long +1 record times, leave the Fireball in standby to give it an opportunity to compress the music previously recorded to the hard drive.

Note: